Shaping our Water Future: Through Water Quality, Equity & Nature Based Solutions

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Los Angeles currently imports a whopping 70% of their water. And getting it to LA is the largest use of electricity in the state of CA. When water is not captured and utilized within the system, it traverses through the city and out to the ocean. In order to shape a strong water future, we must manage the flow in way that ensures high quality, social equity, and solutions based in nature. Jessica Aldridge, interviews Annelisa Moe, Water Quality Scientist with Heal the Bay and Miguel Ramos External Affairs Outreach Coordinator with the Nature Conservancy.

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Annelisa Ehret Moe is a Water Quality Scientist with Heal the Bay. Annelisa received a B.S. in Earth Science from UC Santa Cruz and an M.S. in Geology from CSU Northridge. She worked at the Central Valley and Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board offices for two years before joining the team at Heal the Bay, where she now helps to keep L.A. water clean and safe by advocating for comprehensive and science-based water quality regulation.

Miguel Ramos completed his Masters in Urban and Regional Planning from California State Polytechnic University Pomona and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology with a focus on Equity and Diversity from California State University Los Angeles. As the External Affairs Outreach Coordinator for the Nature Conservancy he builds relationships and engages with community organizations and elected officials across Southern California to influence public policy that advances urban conservation, community engagement, nature-based projects, and equity in the region. 

On this show we discuss: How LA is shaping a strong Water Future through Water Quality, Equity, and Nature Based Solutions.

Water is life. Clean, safe, reliable, affordable, and the future security of water is nonnegotiable.

Los Angeles, California currently imports a whopping 70% of their water. And getting that water to LA is the largest use of electricity in the state of CA.  When water is not captured and utilized within the system, it traverses through the city and out to the ocean.

In order to shape a strong water future, we must manage the flow in way that ensures high quality, social equity, and solutions based in nature.

This show aired on KPFK on Sept 12, 2019

Photo Credit: Los Angeles Aqueduct Terminus Cascades in Sylmar. Meghan McCarty – KPCC

Interview Hosted by Jessica Aldridge from SoCal 350 and Adventures in Waste.
Engineer: Blake Lampkin
Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
Music: Javier Kadry
Episode 40

Edited 30 September 2019

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About Jack Eidt

Novelist, urban theorist, and environmental journalist, Jack Eidt careens down human-nature's all consuming one-way highway to its inevitable conclusion -- Wilder Utopia. He co-founded Wild Heritage Planners, based out of Los Angeles, California. He can be reached at jack (dot) eidt (at) wilderutopia (dot) com. Follow him on Twitter @WilderUtopia and @JackEidt