Fracking in New Brunswick: Elsipogtog First Nation Takes a Stand

Share

Since June of 2013 the Elsipogtog First Nation community, in New Brunswick, Canada, has gathered on Highway 11 to protest peacefully against the seismic testing conducted by a subsidiary of Houston-based Southwestern Energy Co (SWE). Several violent clashes between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and First Nation people have erupted and SWE has ended their testing until 2015. AlJazeera’s “Fault Lines” went to Mi’kmaq territory, to find out what happens when a First Nation says no to fracking.

Elsipogtog First Nation, Canada, Fracking

A Royal Proclamation day feast brought out over 300 to the anti-fracking blockade in Rexton, New Brunswick in early October. [Photo: Miles Howe]

Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water

Fault Lines – AlJazeera

On October 17, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided a protest site set up by Mi’kmaq people and their supporters trying to prevent a Texas-based corporation from fracking.

The company had received rights to explore for shale gas by the province of New Brunswick.

A video report from Al Jazeera’s Faultlines, Dec 6, 2013.

The raid carried out by police, with dogs and automatic weapons, turned to chaos as residents of the Elsipogtog First Nation arrived to confront them. Police pepper sprayed the elders and fired sock rounds to control the crowd. Six police vehicles were set ablaze, and some 40 people were arrested.

It was the most spectacular eruption yet, of a struggle led by indigenous people to protect the land they say they have never ceded and water they consider sacred – a struggle that grew quietly for three years, and shows no sign of slowing down.

A Houston-based energy company, SWN Resources Canada, facing ferocious resistance from a Mi’kmaq-led coalition, has ended its shale gas exploration work until 2015, says Elsipogtog War Chief John Levi.

“We can’t allow any drilling, we didn’t allow them to do the testing from the beginning,” said Levi.  – APTN

Clash between protesters and the RCMP.

Fault Lines travelled to New Brunswick to ask why their fight caught fire, and find out what happens when Canada’s First Nations say no to resource extraction projects they oppose.

More from Indian Country Today Media Network

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

About The Outpost

WilderUtopia.com regularly posts articles, photo essays, features, and documentaries from around the web that illuminate the challenges to coexistence between city and wild, developed and developing, human and other. To reach out, write to jack (dot) eidt (at) wilderutopia (dot) com. Follow us on Twitter @WilderUtopia