Maya calendar Archive

  • Twenty five hundred years ago, a group of peoples settled Tikal, surrounded by the lowland rainforests of the Petén Basin of northern Guatemala. Their descendants would create a remarkable civilization that populated cities and villages across much of southern Mexico, Belize and Guatemala. Today, it has returned to the forest but turned into a major archeological attraction.

    Maya Ruins at Tikal: A New Beginning at Winter Solstice

    Twenty five hundred years ago, a group of peoples settled Tikal, surrounded by the lowland rainforests of the Petén Basin of northern Guatemala. Their descendants would create a remarkable civilization that populated cities and villages across much of southern Mexico, Belize and Guatemala. Today, it has returned to the forest but turned into a major archeological attraction.

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  • John Lloyd Stephens, who documented important Maya sites in Central America in 1839, described howler monkeys found at the ruins of Copán as "grave and solemn, almost emotionally wounded, as if officiating as the guardians of consecrated ground." Today, in sites such as Tikal, they remain standing guard over the ruins, sharing space with hundreds of tourists.

    Howler Monkeys Among the Maya: Divine Patrons to the Artisans

    John Lloyd Stephens, who documented important Maya sites in Central America in 1839, described howler monkeys found at the ruins of Copán as "grave and solemn, almost emotionally wounded, as if officiating as the guardians of consecrated ground." Today, in sites such as Tikal, they remain standing guard over the ruins, sharing space with hundreds of tourists.

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